Royally Dressed

Britain’s Royal Palaces have hosted centuries of parties and events, and with them an impressive array of costumes and outfits. It therefore comes as no surprise that British high street staple Hobbs is tipping its hat to these graceful buildings for the inspiration for a new collection. Not only are the garments-ranging from an overcoat to a clutch-inspired by Britain’s past glory, they are also made in the Royal Kingdom.

Growing up in Kew Gardens, Kew Palace holds sentimental value for me. My brother, aged three, used to give private tours to family friends who visited us. For a number of years the palace remained shut, a romantic exterior closed to its lovers. Fortunately, after a number of years of fundraising, the Royal Palaces refurbished and reopened this elegant building and the stories it told.

Looking at the Invitation Palace Bag from Hobbs, I can definitely see a homage to the Georgian lace and detail worn by Kew’s former residents.

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Invitation Palace Bag from Hobbs

Invitation Palace Bag from Hobbs

Then there is the Windsor Overcoat, a royal blue symphony.The Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection holds an enormous selection of men’s tailoring and it was a number of overcoats, whose structured silhouette, formed the inspiration for this Hobbs coat. This design has been given a contemporary spin via oversize drop shoulders and a minimalist line.This graceful coat is crafted in wool doeskin from Yorkshire mill Hainsworth, famed for its superb drape and handling. The only question will be do you wear anything underneath it! 

The Windsor Overcoat from Hobbs, as styled by styleandminimalis.com

The Windsor Overcoat from Hobbs, as styled by styleandminimalis.com

Prince William is already taken, and who knows which princess Prince Harry is after but at least with Hobbs you can buy into a royal style.

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This entry was published on June 19, 2014 at 01:28. It’s filed under Insights, SSF Considers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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