Luscious Lace

Lace: this wedding season’s fashion trend looks set to be lace. With the likes of Burberry championing pastel and gem studded lace made in Nottingham it is great that a British fashion titan is supporting a domestic industry. However, wearers heed my cautions: the majority of lace found on the high street will be foreign manufactured; also, lace is a very feminine and delicate textile. Therefore, never wear it too tight, otherwise wearers risk looking like they are being strained through muslin. If your silhouette does not resemble a willow tree I recommend sticking to dark hues (navy, black or camel at a push). Wearing head-to-toe lace, you risk looking like a doily, a single piece should be your statement.

Something for the bride from huckster.com

Something for the bride from hukkster.com

Personally, lace never looks better than when inspired by Victorian fashion. On a recent trip to Alfie’s Antique Market in London I discovered Sheelin Lace where seamstresses can pick-up trimmings for their own creations, collectors can find museum quality garments or budget conscious admirers can wear swatches framed in glass pendants. The master collector is Rosemary Cathcart whose original shop is with Museum in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland.

Now let’s be honest, if you’re going to a British wedding there is a high likelihood you’ll encounter rain and/or cold. I hate how at so many weddings I’m stuck in cold churches and marquees where the weather forces me to stay wrapped in a coat, I have to brave Goosebumps in order to reveal my carefully chosen outfit. At the moment I have my eye on a stunning emerald green trench coat from Burberry which would mean I could wear a coat throughout said weddings without dropping a gem of elegance, or body temperature! I’m secretly hoping it will be in the Summer sale…

I'm green with envy thanks to Burberry's SS14 seasonal trench.

I’m green with envy thanks to Burberry’s SS14 seasonal trench.

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This entry was published on May 28, 2014 at 21:37. It’s filed under Insights, Sartorialists, SSF Considers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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